My Metal Object Treatment

Post by Ahmed.

Object before treatment.

Object before treatment.

A copper dish coated with tin had dirt and residues of food on the surface.

Mechanical cleaning under the microscope.

Mechanical cleaning under the microscope.

I used mechanical cleaning to remove the dust from the surface under the microscope.   After that I used calcium carbonate and water on cotton swabs for cleaning.

Mechanical cleaning.

Mechanical cleaning.

DSC07691

Posted in Advanced Students, Conservation, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Testing for salts in pottery.

Post by Barnadet.

This pottery jar with a spherical shape has a circular base and brown stripes on the body (registration number IM222239 – Iraqi Museum).  I worked on testing for soluble salt by using distilled water after taking a sample from the jar.  I put on the sample a drop of nitric acid, then a drop of silver nitrate.  The result was positive so the jar contains chloride salt.

Dropping silver nitrate on the sample to test for chlorides.

Dropping silver nitrate on the sample to test for chlorides.

Posted in Advanced Students, Archaeology, Conservation, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Examining and Storing a New Textile

Post by Ali.

When a new textile comes into the museum, it needs to be examined before storing it.  For that we need to follow these steps:

  1. The textile is placed on a table and examined thoroughly in search of anything that might damage it.
  2. Remove any material on the piece like unconnected threads, dirt and dust.
  3. If there are insect holes in the textile or insects or eggs, we put the textile through a freezing or heating procedure to kill live insects.
  4. At the Institute, the textile is kept in the freezer for two weeks then checked again for insects.
  5. After the elimination of insects, the textile is ready to be stored.
Preparing a textile for the freezer.  Freezing kills live insects.

Preparing a textile for the freezer. Freezing kills live insects.

Posted in Conservation, Introductory Students, Museum Studies, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Test strips

Post by Nyan

Choosing a spot to test on an ancient pottery artifact.

Choosing a spot to test on an ancient pottery artifact.

Test for nitrates (NO3)  soluble salt

Equipment

  • Nitrate test paper
  • Distilled water
  • Dropper

I put two drops of distilled water on the jar and then put the test strip (nitrate test paper) on the jar and held it there for about a minute.  The color changing means that there are nitrates in the jar.

The test strip shows a postive result.

The test strip shows a negative result.

Posted in Advanced Students, Archaeology, Conservation, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Microscopic Examination

Post by Hashem.

Examining the artifact

Examining the artifact

Examining an archaeological artifact under the microscope for inspection to study its condition.  Is it deteriorated or not ? Has it it reacted with the surrounding environment or with other substances or not?  We also investigate the materials of the artifact this way.

Documenting the observations

Documenting the observations

Posted in Conservation, Introductory Students, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Conservation Photography

Post by Sara

Documentation photograph before treatment.  Note the label, scale and color card.

Documentation photograph before treatment. Note the label, scale and color card.

Photography of the object (before, during and after treatment).  This kind of documentation serves as a visible record and also to show the materials and the techniques used for conservation

Treating the artifact.

Treating the artifact.

Artifact during treatment.

Artifact during treatment.

It will also be of a great value to those who will come later to examine or work on the object

The photos can also be used to compare the objects we worked on with photos of other  objects that suffer from similar problems

After treatment, front of the object.

After treatment, front of the object.

After treatment photograph, reverse of the object.

After treatment photograph, reverse of the object.

Posted in Conservation, Introductory Students, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

A Trip to Slemani.

Post by Dena.

At the beginning of the second module of the conservation course which started in March, and after our first home practicum projects had been discussed, then one of the advisory council members, Lois Olcott Price visited the institute and gave us some information about the Winterthur museum where she works and talked also about her job there. Later, Miss Jessie Johnson, Academic Director, brought us happy news about a trip to Sulaymaniyah to visit the exhibition which was sponsored by UNESCO in the museum of Slemani.

The next day we went there, the weather was wonderful and the trip was interesting especially with the presence of Miss Jessie and Lois .

The Museum was beautiful and attractive, the pattern of the exhibition was different and there were different kinds of artifacts. The subject of the exhibition was “IN WRITING”.  After we finished our tour in the museum we took this beautiful picture together.  Then we went to a restaurant for lunch with Jessie and Lois.  It was very delicious.  After lunch we came back to Erbil and the next day we discussed what we had seen in the museum.

The Introductory class students at the Slemani Museum.

The IICAH students at the Slemani Museum.

Posted in Archaeology, Conservation, Introductory Students, Museum Studies, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Photographing artifacts.

Post by Faisel.

Photographing a textile.

Photographing a textile.

Photographing a textile.  Because of its flat surface (as teacher Sebastian taught us) it was necessary to take the photo from above, with the use of light and arranging the camera on the stand and balancing it to have the best position to take a photo of this piece.

Arranging the light.

Arranging the light.

.Arranging the light to take a photo of an archaeological object

Posted in Archaeology, Conservation, Introductory Students, University of Delaware | Leave a comment

Test for Chloride using Nitric Acid and Silver Nitrate

Post by Mohamed.

First thing is taking samples from the object.

First thing is taking samples from the object.

Materials and tools for the test.

Materials and tools for the test.

Then some drops of distilled water to dissolve the salts.

Then some drops of distilled water to dissolve the salts.

Add nitric acid to acidify it.

Add nitric acid to acidify it.

By adding silver nitrate it will form a white precipitate, and this is an indicator of the presence of soluble salts.

By adding silver nitrate it will form a white precipitate, and this is an indicator of the presence of soluble salts.

Posted in Advanced Students, Archaeology, Conservation, University of Delaware | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Hanging a textile.

Post by Dived.

A good way to hang a textile on the wall is by using Velcro. Here is how it works:

1. Sew the Velcro to the textile.  Put the soft part on the back of textile and the hard part on the piece of wood.

Sewing Velcro to the back of the historic textile.

2. Put the wood on the wall with screws to make it fixed and stable.

Using screws to attach the wood support to the wall.

3. Hang  the textile on the wood that is on the wall.

Putting Velcro sewn to the textile to the Velcro attached to the wood.

Checking to make sure everything is straight, smooth and secure.

Posted in Advanced Students, Conservation, University of Delaware | Leave a comment